It’s never too late to get fit!

by Derek

Advice from Personal Trainer Derek Gardner When I was asked to start writing these fitness articles the idea was that I should write for a section of the population that is around 50 years of age.



Advice from Personal Trainer Derek Gardner

When I was asked to start writing these fitness articles the idea was that I should write for a section of the population that is around 50 years of age. Now, some might say (including my son!) that when you reach the ripe old age of 50, you are just about past it when it comes to getting fit, and that you should be looking forward to collecting you pension! Wrong! There are lots of 50 year old men and women out there, who can out-train people who are 10 years younger, and some that have even taken up such extreme sports as marathon running! I know, because I train some of them.

“So how do I get to that level of fitness?” is something my clients often ask. Well, you could start by going to the gym, and ‘adopting’ a treadmill, and doing hours and hours of slow ‘cardio zone’ running. Which would make you fitter, in the short term, but there is a limit on how fit that would make you.

Alternatively, you could invest in one of those very popular body building magazine. Again, you would see a change, but all those muscles won’t help you climb Everest, or do a triathlon.

My suggestion would be to start a combination of both. Here’s why. If you want to build a house that’s going to last for a lifetime, you need a solid foundation. The same applies if you want to build (or rebuild) a body to last you a lifetime, you need a solid base of fitness. You should start very steadily, increasing the intensity every session, if you can. But don’t worry if you can’t. Rome was not built in a day. It should be a combination of short intense aerobic work, with resistance work which can be body weight or free weight. The important thing about the resistance work is that it should be done with ‘good form’. For this you may need the help of a fitness professional, but even if you only have one session it will be worth it, as the advice and instruction could help avoid injuries caused by bad form, or improper programme design.

For more information, or advice relating to this article, or any of my previous posts, please feel free to email me at derek@healthmattersplus.co.uk

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